Freeze Your Gizzard Blizzard 10K

Freeze Your Gizzard Blizzard 10K

Saturday morning found me wide awake at 4 a.m., thinking about a race. So many things going through my mind, with my heart being at the top of the list. Sometimes I get a little hung up over the logistical issues in cold weather like what shoes I should bring, how many layers of clothing I should wear, ect. But it doesn’t end there for me because I also need to look out for my wounded heart. I took up running to help strengthen the heart, not weaken it, and I believe there is a balance that must be met to keep everything on the healthy side. As a competitive person by nature, I love the adrenaline rush experienced in a race more than the competition itself. Most of my life I’ve been chasing that rush.

Whether I’m riding a snowmobile, motorcycle, driving a fast car, or a pair of running shoes, my apparent need for speed is nothing more than a craving for adrenaline. Since I started running only four years ago, I have discovered running has the same exact adrenaline producing effect on me as racing motorcycles and snowmobiles. No doubt about it, I am an adrenaline junky and love the added kick I get from a dose of adrenaline. Over the years, I have enjoyed various motorsports. I lost count a long time ago of how many snowmobile motors, dirt bikes motors, boat motors, and car motors, that blew up while I was using them to race someone or something. 99 percent of those motors usually died prematurely for one or three reasons. Exceeding the red-line, improper warm up, or a combination of both.

The only injuries I have suffered from running are muscle injury’s that occurred because I skipped warming up and pegged my heart rate to the red-line right out of the gate.  As most people who exercise hard, or who play sports already know, one of the fastest ways to take out a muscle is to work it work it too hard before allowing the body to warm up. 8 years of living with heart failure has taught me to view my heart much the same way as I view a high-performance motor.  Both need an adequate warm up period before they will function properly.  When doing anaerobic work such as racing in a 5k or a 10K, warming up is not only easier on the heart, it also results in a faster time.

There are many physiological responses that take place in the body during as we start running. Warming up properly, enables many of these Reponses to take place while the body is still in its aerobic zone. This results in a lower sustained heart rate once we are in the anaerobic zone. More importantly and to the point, warming up slowly places significantly less stress/strain on the heart.  After a couple years running exclusively with  a heart rate monitor, I learned that my heart rate runs 10-15 bpm faster during cold weather (like the weather at freeze your gizzard blizzard 10K). I have also learned through trial and error, that skipping the warm up for a 5k or a 10k, even during warm weather, significantly lowers my finish times while producing a higher average heart rate and a slower recovery. Cold weather significantly exasperates these issues since my heart isn’t pumping at full capacity.

Warming up before a race can be difficult during a northern Minnesota winter. Standing in the corral at the start line can be a chilling experience when your dressed in light running attire and the temperature is below freezing with snow on the ground. For me, to even think of a new 10K personal record, I need to run the first mile only a few seconds slower than the last mile. This  means that I must start the race at a pace that places me well into my anaerobic zone right from the start.

So after laying awake in bed thinking about all this stuff for half the night before the “Freeze Your Gizzard Blizzard 10K” I decided to skip the racing altogether and to just run for fun with my wife who races at a pace that’s 3-4 minutes per mile slower then mine. Although I did miss feeling that adrenaline kick, I had a blast. Running slower allowed me to relax and just have fun while taking it all in. I plan on running more races just for fun in the future. No pressure, no stress, just an enjoyable time running with my wife and hundreds of other people. It really was a great time. The City of International Falls did an awesome job of hosting this race and I was really surprised at how well everything was set up. Lots of small town charm and that friendly charm I would expect from a small town in the border country of Minnesota.

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